CASE STUDY

ORIGINAL DESCRIPTION IN PATIENT’S OWN WORDS

“Prof. Jayant Barve (photo left in white shirt next to Dr. Basarkar), founder of Jayashree Garden has been in organic farming since 1988 and in Homa organic farming (HOF) since 2011. He is a retired Professor of Physics and he is very well known in India. He cultivates a big variety of crops and owns lots of country cows. His pomegranate has earned him a good name. He also runs a factory where natural bio-fertilizer is prepared in which he adds 50 grams of Agnihotra ash to each 50 kg bag. Users have reported good improvement in their crops as compared to the compost without Agnihotra ash and he receives laurels from his clients. Mr. Jayant Barve explained that during 1992-95 vermicompost was widely used in agriculture. Then it declined since farmers did not understand the importance of inoculums (microorganisms in the soil) along with vermicompost. He himself was reluctant to start Homa organic farming because of lack of knowledge but he opted for HOF during the severe draught period of 2011-12. When he studied the Homa literature he felt that something was missing on his farm. He constructed the Agnihotra hut and started practicing it. A Homa Resonance Point (HRP) was established. He realized the difference in the ambience and atmosphere with and without Agnihotra.”
“The subsequent year, even though the draught was more severe than the previous year, he had sufficient water for the cattle and the crop since his well kept on providing sufficient water. He relates his experience to that of Lee and Frits Rigma of Om Shri Dham Homa farm in Hunter valley, Australia. They demonstrated that Agnihotra performance drew water from a distant place to their farm. They attributed this effect to the practice of Homa organic farming. Prof. Barve explained in detail the importance of organic matter and of microorganisms in the field for better crop growth. It was observed that farmers usually neglect these aspects and do not realize the importance of inoculums. Note: One cow dung dropping is sufficient to supply microbial inoculants to one ha (2.5 acres) land.

Dr. Pramod Basarkar,

Jayashree Homa Garden,

Vita, District Sangli, Maharashtra,

India